Strategy: Re: [linux-elitists] LOCAL Stanford University: face down the DMCA enforcers

Karsten M. Self kmself@ix.netcom.com
Tue Jan 21 01:35:59 PST 2003


on Fri, Jan 17, 2003 at 05:08:47PM -0800, Don Marti (dmarti@zgp.org) wrote:
> Richard Stallman just passed this along to me.  I won't be around,
> since I'll be in New York for LinuxWorld, but someone else might
> want to organize a group of freedom-loving people to go and hand
> out some anti-DMCA flyers, ask good questions, and so on.
> 
> "How can you enforce laws that ban Academic Freedom in computer
> science and then walk into a university and ask for help?"
> 
> Remember, protests and demonstrations are GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH.

This action call from Don has raised a flurry here.  Nobody's noticed
that Don was asking for someone to take on a leadership mantel in
getting people to show to the talk itself.  I'll give this a go.

Drafting a call:

Where:  NEC Auditorium, Gates Computer Science Building B03, Stanford
        University Campus

When:   4:15 PM, Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003

What:   "Solving High Technology Crime" -- ...and our beef is?


Our problem with this is (my stab at what RMS and Don were pitching at):

    The crimes affecting our corporate partners include computer
    hacking, intellectual property crimes (criminal trademark and
    copyright infringement) and identity theft. These crimes are costing
    the high technology community billions of dollars and stunting the
    acceptance and growth of these technologies to support our economy. 

So the activities identified are:

  - Hacking (we presume this means cracking).

  - IP Property crimes:  copyright and trademark infringement.

  - Identity theft.


Each of these turns on the two principle tenets of the DMCA (anti-circ
and infringement takedown remedies). 

Cracking and ID theft both revolve principally around concepts of system
security, configuration, and encryption.

Copyright infringement coverage in the trade press seems to largely
focus on the issues of software infringement and music swapping.

Can we get a clearer statement of what we're most concerned with here --
at 1am, I'm not doing particularly well myself.


Main themes I see:

  - Infringement damage estimates are often grossly inflated.

  - Responses, particularly BSA license shakedown rackets, are seen as
    inappropriate.

  - Music/media swapping is a legal gray area.  It's not clear that this
    is or isn't illegal.

  - DRM tosses a whole 'nother ball of wax into the loop.  Though it's
    not clear the speakers are addressing this.

  - Cracking.  Where to start.  Steve Jackson Games comes to mind.
    Point 1. is that cracking is almost always negligence on the part of
    the cracked site (and coverup).  Point 2. is that common proprietary
    SW security stinks.  Point 3. is that diagnostic / interrogative
    actions can be interpreted as cracking (reporters who entered a URL
    to gain access to corporate info).

  - Identity theft.  Far more an indictment of current authentication
    and financial infrastructures than a law enforcement issue.
    Something I actually know something about.  Not tons, but I've
    worked with financial data, fraud and bankrupcy prediction models
    for Visa.  Credit bureaus.  IMO this is a "problem" largely caused
    by industries unwillingness to reform its own practices.

Anyone care to help here?

Sources for DMCA lit?  EFF?



> Other participants include:
> Robert Rodriguez, Assistant Special Agent in Charge, United
> States Secret Service
> Richard Perlotto, Cisco Systems
> Chris Lalone, Network Security, eBay
> Mike Miravalle, CEO, Dolphin Technologies
> Fred Demma, Dolphon Technologyies
> 
> About the talk:
> 
> The San Francisco Electronic Crimes Task Force seeks to engage
> the academic community to help us address the technology crimes
> affecting our community, our corporate partners and law
> enforcement. The crimes affecting our corporate partners include
> computer hacking, intellectual property crimes (criminal
> trademark and copyright infringement) and identity theft. These
> crimes are costing the high technology community billions of
> dollars and stunting the acceptance and growth of these
> technologies to support our economy. Antiquated investigative
> methods and poor individual accountability for Internet
> communications are some of the greatest challenges facing law
> enforcement. The solution to some of these challenges may lie
> within the academic community.
> 
> The talk will focus on several brief case studies relating our
> greatest challenges in fighting high technology crime. Each case
> study will be presented by a law enforcement agent and/or
> corporate partner of the task force.
> 
> About the speaker:
> 
> The San Francisco Electronic Crimes Task Force is a group of
> Federal, state, local investigators and corporate partners, lead
> by the U.S. Secret Service, focused on attacking high technology
> crime affecting Bay Area companies, locally and globally. The
> task force is part of the Secret Service's nation-wide network of
> electronic crimes task forces, see http://www.ectaskforce.org[2].
> 
> Contact information:
> 
> San Francisco Electronic Crimes Task Force
> 345 Spear St
> San Francisco, CA
> (415) 744-9026
> 
> Acknowledgements:
> 
> Thanks to the Computer Forum[3] and to Professors Dan Boneh and
> John Mitchell for assistance in organizing this event.
> 
> 
> Embedded Links:
> [ 1 ]    http://ee380.stanford.edu
> [ 2 ]    http://www.ectaskforce.org
> [ 3 ]    http://www-forum.stanford.edu
> ------- End of forwarded message -------
> 
> 
> ----- End forwarded message -----
> 
> _______________________________________________
> linux-elitists 
> http://zgp.org/mailman/listinfo/linux-elitists
> 

-- 
Karsten M. Self <kmself@ix.netcom.com>        http://kmself.home.netcom.com/
 What Part of "Gestalt" don't you understand?
   Geek for hire:  http://kmself.home.netcom.com/resume.html



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